Posts tagged “Rollei

First Leap into Infrared Film Photography

I think it was 3 years ago when I bought a Hoya R72 filter with an adapter to fit my Hasselblad lenses. I also bought a 35mm Rollei Infrared film. 35mm? Yes. I don’t know why but I bought 35mm infrared film, obviously I wasn’t thinking straight 😉 It took me quite a bit of time to finally start working with this. I thought, before I hit the big 30 later this week (Thursday to be exact, Doomsday to be more specific) I should at least have done this once.

After having worked two whole weeks except for Sundays I had the past Monday off and when I woke up at 9:30 I thought, WOW, this looks like a great day to finally go IR all the way. I jumped out of bed, took a happy shower, took care of my bunnies, ate something and packed my stuff. The weather was awesome so decided to make a small trip on my bike through lovely Limburg-land.

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The first two kilometres I used to pick up some 120 film at my work when I realised I only had 1 roll of 35mm in the fridge. The other 48 I used to find locations to my liking but also to enjoy the biking. My favourite sport is spinning and at the moment I’m actually saving up to buy a proper racing bike so this journey was quite the pleasant one!

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The weather was absolutely perfect as you can see on the Snapseeded iPhone photos (I solely work on black-and-white, unless stated otherwise, so all the colourful photos on here are either made with the iPhone or the Canon Powershot S100). The temperature was around 24 degrees, sunny but with marvellous clouds to cheer up the scenery. Blue skies are pretty much boring, except when laying next to a pool 😉

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So, how did I go about it? After a quick read on the www I determined the following M.O.: I set external light meter to 64 asa and measured the scenery. I took that reading and compensated 5 stops for the filter. The desired aperture for me was F/16 so I made a bracketing of 1/2, 1 and approx. 2 seconds. The reason I used F/16 is to compensate for any flaws in focusing. Because this infrared film records a different wavelength focusing is a bit different. My 50mm FLE has a small red line especially for IR photography. I shoot landscapes and normally focus on infinity, then I turned the infinity mark to match the red line on the lens, to the ‘new’ infinity line for infrared so to speak and voila!

Details
Film: Rollei Infrared 400
Filter: Hoya R72
Camera: Hasselblad 500CM + 50mm FLE

Exposure: 1/2 second at F/16 (all images you see here)
Developing: Kodak HC110 dilution B for 9 minutes at 20 degrees
Scan: using Epson V700 (done nothing special, it’s about the print later on anyway, a negative is nothing more than just a starting point ;-))

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There are a couple of things that stand out, besides the obvious IR effect which I dig and think it will look pretty combined with lith. The first is that the negatives are really dense. Even the shadows are dense. Really dense. BUT, I do have a lot of detail. And grain 😉 I made contact sheets today (which look much more impressive than these scans btw), I had the lens fully opened (Componon-S 80mm F4) and had an exposure time of 85 seconds. Huhum, my ‘normal’ negatives usually require something closer to 5 seconds, so to give you an idea.

Secondly: I seem to be suffering from a light leak. Well, not me but my camera. Not sure what causes this, especially since with some they are on the left side and with others they are on the right. I have to admit I did not change the films in the dark (no hell no, I’m working outside in the sun!) but I might try changing them in shadows next time, when I can find them 😉

I had a chat with Robert Hall who discussed my results (thank you!) and I will change some things next time:
I will shoot a roll at the same exposure time of 1/2 and bracket 2 stops shorter; development time shorter than I have now (7 minutes or something, yet to determine).
I will shoot a roll where I will measure the light with my Spotmeter F at F/12 and skip the compensating for the filter. Develop as I did this time.
Change developer: Robert recommended using a staining developer like PMK or Pyrocat.

Conclusion: haha, I’ll get back to you next time, enjoy your evening 😉

Ohhhh and a very big tip for when riding 50 kilometres on a bike: Wear decent bike pants!! I should have known that 😉
For the ones interested in where these photos are taken: Somewhere between Eijsden, Mesch, Lixhe, Voeren and Maastricht etc.

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Rollei Redbird – 2nd Try

So…I had to give this film a second try and my recent trip to Ellmau, Austria had its name written all over it! I promised to overexpose the film and I certainly did. This time I exposed the film as if it were a 25 ASA film instead of the affirmed 400. This included compensation for the snow. Yes, snow…I went skiing for the first time in my life!

This film is a whole lot more usable than the first roll I shot and I’m looking forward processing them the lith-way. For now I give you the all-boring-merely-scans-of-negatives-sh*t 😉

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The colours are quite fascinating and, not being perfect right now, work pretty well with the subject. This makes me certain lith will work with these very well. Whenever I end up having more time (nooo, I promised myself I would have more time this year, darn 😦 ) I will be working more on this. First I have to shoot some collodion plates again!


Rollei Redbird Film

I’m not much of a fan of colour in my personal work but seeing the results (and we started selling this film at work) I thought it would be cool to try and shoot a roll. Having read that you can lith print colour film I thought it would be kind of cool and, as such, not a necessary waste of efforts. Well, it is kind of cool though I can be rather short about this first roll of film….OVEREXPOSE!

Pretty logical when you know it’s a reversed winded film. The light has to penetrate the base layer first before hitting the light sensitive part. I liked it enough to buy a second roll which I will expose as 100 or maybe even 50 ASA, but definitely not as the rated 400 ASA! From what I read online it’s tough to overexpose this film 😉

Below an example of an accidentally “correctly” exposed negative and from an underexposed one, the latter being absolutely unusable with its grain. Images have been taken with the Leica M6 coupled with the Elmarit 28mm f/2,8

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Fun nonetheless and looking forward to the next film 😉


1st & 2nd Pass Lith Printing

As mentioned in the former post I dived into the second pass lith printing thingy. This means exposing the paper like normal, developing in standard bw-developer, stopping, fixing, rinsing, bleaching the print in a sepia bleach bath, rinsing, re-developing in Lith. Below I’ll describe how I did it, which chemistry I used, which papers etc. and the only thing you’ll have to pick up from this post is NOT to do it like I did now. It didn’t quite work out the way I anticipated it, mostly because of lack in technique.

Papers used:
* Ilford MGW.1K, fiber based warmtone paper
* Ilford MGT.44M, PE based warmtone pearl paper
* Ilford MG ART 300 paper (their new stuff)
* Ilford IB0.26K, Ilfobrom expired grade 0 paper
* Ilford IB4.26K, Ilfobrom expired grade 4 paper
* Rollei 131, fiber based warmtone paper

Chemistry used:
* 1st pass standard bw-developer Amaloco AM6006 1+9
* 2nd pass Moersch Easylith developer 1+1+24, + 50ml old brown in a total bath of 2 litres
* Sepia Bleach home-made: 100 gr Potassium FerriCyanide & 100 gr Potassium Bromide to 1 litre of water
* Amaloco S10 stopping bath 1+19
* Amaloco X89 fixing bath 1+4

Other variables:
* Temperature of lith developer +/- 30 degrees Celsius
* No MG filters used when exposing the paper
* Bleaching time approx. for all prints: 3 minutes

I think I screwed up on a couple of points. First of all, I used to many  different kinds of paper. This was my first try-out with bleaching and redeveloping it would’ve been smarter to just try one or two papers, take it from there and when I feel I got it a bit under control, try more papers. But, as I don’t have that much time, I figured the more the merrier. Well, not always 😉

Secondly, I’ll try a different 1st developer as it’s supposed to have an effect on the outcome after the 2nd development. I will try Agfa’s Neutol WA next.

Thirdly, I noticed a lot of stains, stripes and the like turning up during the 2nd pass developing. According to Tim Rudman’s book this is due to sloppy technique (which is quite possible) or bad rinsing, pollution etc. I rinsed too many papers in a too cold a rinsing bath because of my urge ‘the more the merrier’ so I screwed up there I think. Also, I didn’t hypo the prints after fixing. I though a decent rinse would be just as effective for this testing phase. I should know better.

What I didn’t like about the redeveloped prints is that they don’t have the coloration I wanted, they remain pretty much black and white, like before I bleached them. Perhaps that has to do with the amount of time I redeveloped them? Too long for the strength of the developer? Maybe I bleached the prints too long?
And I will try the SE5 as the 2nd pass lith bath. It’s the bath I want to go work with in the future so what’s the point anyway with using the Easylith when I know I want to switch entirely anyway.

It’s a whole new world which I will go back to this afternoon. I hope the new tryouts will be a bit more of what I’m after. I’ll be using the paper Ilford MGW.1K and if I can find the time, also the MG ART 300. Agfa Neutol WA as 1st developer and SE5 as my second. I’ll reduce the bleaching time to about 1 minute to see what that changes. Anyway, not all at once 😉

An example of a bleached print before re-developing in lith

bleachedprint

Ilford MG ART 300
7s exposure time | no filter
AM6006 normal bw developing (BORING) | 1:30 minutes | 20 degrees Celsius

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Ilford MG ART 300
40s exposure time | no filter
Amaloco AM6006 normal bw developing | 1:30 minutes | 20 degrees Celsius

1st pass Easylith 1+1+24 | 1/2 Old Brown | 4:25 minutes | 30 degrees Celsius

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Ilford MG ART 300
7s exposure time | no filter
AM6006 | 3 minute sepia bleach
2nd pass Easylith 1+1+24 | + 1/2 old brown | +/- 30 degrees Celsius

Ilford MG ART 300
7s exposure time | no filter
Amaloco AM6006 normal bw developing | 1:30 minutes | 20 degrees Celsius

2nd pass Easylith 1+1+24 | 1/2 Old Brown | 8 minutes | 30 degrees Celsius

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The rest of the images really isn’t worth posting. I don’t even know what to make of them..let alone make them into a comprehensive something. I’ll slowly back away now and lock myself up in the basement for some more juice 😉


Rollei Lith Failure = Moersch Easylith & SE5

After the failure of the Rollei kit last time (oh I didn’t mention that yet, did I?) I decided to go ahead and order the Moersch chemistry. The story of the Rollei kit first then..

I started a lith printing session as usual, by making the baths. I bought some new Rollei Vintage developer as I had too little left for one bath. I decided to mingle the old with the new chemistry in the dilution 115+115+2770 (1+1+24). The paper I used is the new Foma 131 FB. The images didn’t get a proper black. Oh well, I thought, maybe the old bit I mixed in is overaged so I made a whole new fresh batch. Nothing came on the paper…

Okay, maybe I exposed the wrong side of the paper? Doesn’t happen often but it’s possible. Again, nothing on the paper. Darn. Maybe I underexposed the paper (never worked with the new Foma 131 emulsion before). So I exposed 4 times longer. Again, nothing on the paper. And by nothing I mean absolutely nothing. Crap, maybe I accidentally mixed up part A and B the wrong way? I made a whole new fresh bath. Again, nothing on the paper. By now I got thoroughly agitated seeing that I wasted a whole lot of chemistry and expensive paper. Maybe the paper is off? I tried my old familiar Foma 131 FB paper. Nothing. Nothing. Nothing. By this time I was convinced it had to be the developer as everything else worked fine before. I mailed the company I ordered it from but haven’t heard from them yet.

Easylith

I was working on prints for an exhibition, I finished a series, the deadline moved towards 2013 and seeing that I wasn’t a 100% happy with the first series I decided to redo them. Well, I guess I just ran out of luck somewhere 😉 Fed up with the Rollei kit I decided it was time to take the plunge on the Moersch lith developers, which I intended to try for a while now. I ordered the Easylith (to compare a little against the Rollei kit) and ordered the SE5 as with all the additives possible it’s better refineable and controllable than the Easylith. The chemistry arrived yesterday so hope to find the time soon to use it, maybe even this year!

SE5

 


Lith Prints – Italy 2012

Finally the day arrived the darkroom would be all for me and I needed to make some lith prints for an exhibition. Last Tuesday I went in, first making some contact sheets of films I shot in Italy this year. Those looked promising! With a good mood I started the lith printing session only to end it rather disillusioned that very same evening. I had trouble finding the exposure time of the paper, I kept over-developing the paper time on time again which results in blocked blacks. For some reason I just couldn’t find the swing, even with negatives I printed before and had notes to refer back to. I ended the day with one print that would be a keeper. Not too shabby but far less than I normally end up with.

On top of that I ran out of chemistry and felt I was running out of paper as well. I had plenty of 18×24 but was making the bigger prints on 30×40 sheets. Luckily I still had quite a bit of 40×50 paper laying around so could’ve always cut that up. Next day at work I placed a speed-order for the paper, chemistry had already been ordered, and it took them two days to deliver the latter. The paper however still hasn’t arrived.

Last Friday I was able to take an extra day off at work to continue where I left off on Tuesday. Great! This day was definitely a whole lot more successful! I ‘finished’ the four other prints I needed for the exhibition (They still require quite a bit of work. Want to experiment a little with bleaching back certain parts and they require toning, selenium & gold, want to try a split tone) and was even able to try some photos I took in Italy this year which I shot with my new Elmarit 28mm f/2,8 on the Leica M6. This was a wonderful combination to work with, light, compact and an absolute solid friend for traveling purposes. No more dragging around the Hass with its lenses (although on the go I usually referred to the 50mm FLE only). These prints are the ones I wanna share today. They are test prints so want to work on them more but they certainly have great potential in my opinion!

General Information:
Rollei 131 Vintage FB Paper
Rollei Vintage Lith Developer 1+1+24
Average development time: 8 minutes
(average as in I’m too lazy to go look up my notes for the exact times ;-))

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A small village called Hafling (Avelengo) in South Tirol, Italy. This village is situated at a height of 1200 meters.

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The woods of a small village called Hafling (Avelengo) in South Tirol, Italy. This village is situated at a height of 1200 meters.

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One of the bigger villages called Merano in South Tirol, Italy.

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The woods of a small village called Hafling (Avelengo) in South Tirol, Italy. This village is situated at a height of 1200 meters.

 

These are still a work in progress and will make a broader selection of images as I really like them. With the overview landscapes with mountains in the back the lith process really emphasises the clear contrasty foreground opposed to the delicate tones of the mountains in the far background. I really like this. I’m not sure if this will be for this year as it will get really busy at work now but 2013 will be MINE!

-x 🙂 x-

 

 


Lith Prints: On the Nature of Daylight

The last two days I had finally had the evenings for myself! First time this year I could actually work on my own photos. Sometimes I think I ought to quit my job 😉

Not long before those evenings I also finally came around to developing some film I had laying around from last year. The contact prints made me wanna grab my lith paper so I did. The prints are untoned and so on, test prints actually to see which way this series would go on lith but I love them already. This will be continued but I felt like sharing them anyway with some more inspirational stuff.

Kodak T-Max 100 I Hasselblad 500C/M + 50mm CF FLE I Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB I Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 I Exposure: f5,6 5 sec I Development: about 7 min. 36 sec I Untoned

Kodak T-Max 100 I Hasselblad 500C/M + 50mm CF FLE I Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB I Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 I Exposure: f5,6 5 sec I Development: about 7 min. 35 sec I Untoned

Kodak T-Max 100 I Hasselblad 500C/M + 50mm CF FLE I Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB I Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 I Exposure: f5,6 5 sec I Development: about 8 min. 06 sec I Untoned

Kodak T-Max 100 I Hasselblad 500C/M + 50mm CF FLE I Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB I Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 I Exposure: f5,6 5 sec I Development: about 7 min. 20 sec I Untoned

Kodak T-Max 100 I Hasselblad 500C/M + 50mm CF FLE I Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB I Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 I Exposure: f5,6 5 sec I Development: about 7 min. 35 sec I Untoned

Kodak T-Max 100 I Hasselblad 500C/M + 50mm CF FLE I Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB I Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 I Exposure: f5,6 5 sec I Development: about 7 min. 35 sec I Untoned

The title of the series comes from Max Richter. I’m such a big fan of his work. He made a remix of his original song combined with the lyrics of Dinah Washington’s song dating from 1960.

“This bitter Earth
Well, what fruit it bears?

Ooooh
This bitter Earth

And if my life
Is like the dust
Oooh, that hides
The glow of a rose
What good am I?
Heaven only knows.

Lord, this bitter Earth
Yes, can be so cold
Today you’re young
Too soon, you’re old
But while a voice
Within me cries
I’m sure someone may answer my call.

And this bitter Earth
Ooooh, may not
Ooooh, be so bitter
After all.

This bitter Earth
Lord, this bitter Earth
What good is love
Mmmm, that no one shares?

And if my life
Is like the dust
That hides
The glow of a rose
What good am I?
Heaven only knows.”

I hope you enjoy this post!

-Indra


Toner vs No Toner

I promised I’d show the difference between a toned and an untoned image. Please keep in mind that the untoned and toned images are slightly different prints so there’s a difference there as well, albeit very small. You can see the coloration and the -coming-to-life of the image. Both images were printed on Rollei Vintage paper 131, developer in Rollei Lith developer 1+1+24 and the toned images are on the left and toned in Selenium 1+4 at approx. 20 degrees.

 

 


“Weird-Square-in-Florence-But-Good-For-Portfolio” Liths Toned

Hmm, weird title but I mentioned it somewhere before when talking about this particular series. Where would the world be without consistency, right 😉

Anyway, the prints finally received their toning. I used Kodak Selenium 1+4 for about 1 and a half minutes per print. Besides the archival aspect of toning it would be cool to see what the coloration would be like…nothing short of color with the combination of Rollei 131 & toner! I’ll most likely print these again and try some split toning when I receive my Tetenal Gold toner which makes things even more exciting. I can then combine blue and brownish on one print which offers a broad range of possibilities on its own again. Enough talking…

aper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 22 sec. filter 3 Development: about 6 minutes  Selenium Toned: 1+4 1 1/2 min.

Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 22 sec. Filter 3, Development: about 6 minutes, Selenium Toned: 1+4 1 1/2 min.

Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 2+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 16 sec. filter 3 Development: about 4 minutes  Selenium Toned: 1+4. 1 1/2 min.

Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 2+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 16 sec. Filter 3, Development: about 4 minutes, Selenium Toned: 1+4. 1 1/2 min.

Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 20 sec. filter 3 Development: about 5 1/2 minutes  Selenium Toned: 1+4 1 1/2 min.

Paper: Rollei Vintage 131 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 1+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 20 sec. Filter 3, Development: about 5 1/2 minutes, Selenium Toned: 1+4 1 1/2 min.

The toning causes them to jump to life even more, even though they were not lame before but still. I like it quite a bit although I wouldn’t mind further fine-tuning even if it’s just for experiment’s sake. I’ll even HAVE to fine-tune and experiment to get better and gain absolute control of what I do. Theory means nothing on its own but you’ll need the theory to support your creativity and to be able to use in your advantage. So…I’ll be spending some more hours in my kitty-dork-dungeon 😉

Oh, and not to be like an advertorial person but the book of Tim Rudman that I bought…wow….contains lots of useful information and give you a glimpse of how easy and foremost, how difficult the process is. Lots of variables and such… To anyone wanting to play around with lith printing I can wholeheartedly recommend it!


Emotional Film Part 2: Selenium Toned

It took me a while but I now that the holidays, birthdays and the likes (or dislikes) are over I finally have time to spend in my lovely darkroom. This part I spent toning already printed images. I’ll post the results of the first series here (see former post for more details on them).

Toner used is Kodak Selenium dilution 1+4 for about 2 minutes. With this Rollei 131 paper the toning happens very rapidly and the color was even more evident while wet. The images also became a lot more powerful, not only because the blacks became a tad blacker but it also seemed to affect the highlights as if these parts got a bit lighter. I’m not completely happy with these images qua color (a tad too warm for my taste), but also when looking at the images themselves. I think this will be the last time I’ve printed them anyway.

I toned Ilfords MGW.1K paper before and there it was very easy producing split toned images by diluting very moderately and leaving them relatively short in the bath. With this Rollei paper I have yet to find a proper manner to get them split toned without having Selenium followed by another toner such as Gold for example (which I have also ordered). They just seem to absorb the color like mad!

1+4 Selenium Toner +- 2 minutes

1+4 Selenium Toner +- 2 minutes

1+4 Selenium Toner +- 2 minutes

1+4 Selenium Toner +- 2 minutes

1+4 Selenium Toner +- 2 minutes

1+4 Selenium Toner +- 2 minutes

Anyway, I like them a whole lot better than the untoned versions but the color is a but too warm with this subject.