Fomabrom 111 & Lith

What a surprise after the Rollei Vintage paper! Totally different in handling. Exposure time dropped by half compared to the Rollei paper. Contrast greatly diminished which I tried to compensate for by increasing the amount of part A of the developer until I had this dilution: 2+1+24. This helped but it still was less contrasty than the Rollei version of the same image which I’ll post in the next post. I could try and bleach the image a bit but will have to experiment with that (and have to order the chems too).

The thing that jumps in your eye however like immediately is the amount of grain. Grain in the most extended version of the word! Makes the photo more like pictorialism really. I’m not too fond of that; it still is a photograph but it was not all that bad either. Pretty interesting even and when I have the right photo for this kind of extreme effect I’ll definitely go for this combo. Also the coloration of the images were not that obvious as with the Rollei paper.

Anyway, on the 2 examples which I’ll keep for experimental sake.

Paper: Fomabrom 111 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 2+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 11 sec. filter 3 Development: about 6 minutes Not yet toned

Paper: Fomabrom 111 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 2+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 11 sec. filter 3 Development: about 6 minutes Not yet toned

Paper: Fomabrom 111 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 2+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 10 sec. filter 3 Development: about 6 minutes Not yet toned

Paper: Fomabrom 111 FB Developer: Rollei Vintage Developer (Lith) 2+1+24 Exposure: f5,6 10 sec. filter 3 Development: about 6 minutes Not yet toned

Another interesting night in the darkroom, more to follow soon! I also tried my regular Ilford MGW1K paper but that was really not all that great. Hardly any coloration, very little contrast though without the adjusted developer a tad more than the Fomabrom paper and pretty much no added grain / structure to the image which really made it quite boring. At least for my taste anyway 😉

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2 responses

  1. Indra- I saw your posting on Facebook APAP about your blog.

    FYI- Contrast in a Lith print is controlled by the initial exposure. Less exposure, more contrast.Good luck with your printing.It is fun to see the different papers you are using and your results!

    vicki

    November 23, 2010 at 18:18

    • Ah, Thank you for the interesting comment Vicky. My book still has to arrive as it’s really handy to have some theory. I didn’t know that; thank you again!

      -Indra

      November 24, 2010 at 18:18

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