Collodion Literature (German)

A friend of mine who occasionally visits me at where I work has been working with alternative photographic processes for much longer than I’ve been around. He’s done research in different libraries and universities around the world. His name is Eddie Fievez and you can check out his sites over here: Personal Website & Flickr.

Not too long ago he gave me a digital version of some copies he made at the University of Aachen some 35 years ago about the Collodion process, negative based. They were for me to study but I also want to share them with you but I’m not too sure about the rules of copyright with this stuff…I do not mean to harm anyone, if I am please let me know, and I’ll remove them.

If you want the files, also please let me know and I’ll email them to you. Better to read that way than of this screen probably..;)

Page 454

Page 454

Page 455

Page 455

Page 456

Page 456

Page 457

Page 457

Page 458

Page 458

Page 459

Page 459

Page 460

Page 460

Page 461

Page 461

Page 462

Page 462

Page 463

Page 463

Page 464

Page 464

Thanks for looking and I hope you enjoy them!

Advertisements

7 responses

  1. interesting read… many handmoves and techniques quite different than I learned from Quinn 🙂
    last page says, after exposure, wash the plate until is not greasy anymore and then develop. I should try that 🙂

    February 19, 2010 at 23:07

  2. Yeah, indeed a lot different from what I’ve learned too (well, same teacher haha!).
    That sentence on the last page surprised me too, normally you wash until greasiness is gone when arresting the development.
    I wonder that by doing it the other way not too much silver is wiped off the plate which can’t interact with the developer. That is one of the reasons you should use as little developer as possible; to keep all the silver on the plate to react.

    I should create that inlay for the 4×5 tintypes so I can experiment a bit with that. When you do, please let me know what you find!

    🙂

    February 20, 2010 at 10:25

  3. Indra, the thing with the developer and too much silver is a good point, but there is also another developing “technique” where you first use a ferro developer and then apply a second developer that contains silver nitrate. this gives a deeper feeling and more “shine”.
    actually this technique was used mostly for portraits.

    I bought last night an original copy of Hübl Collodion book from 1894. 🙂

    February 20, 2010 at 10:43

    • Hmm, that might be interesting looking in to…
      Congrats with your copy of that book! Great to still see that old material available.

      I have to experiment a lot more, with lots of stuff. How do you find the time to do so much of your printing and so on? I work during the day and have to fix the other stuff at night. What is your secret…? 🙂

      March 5, 2010 at 10:15

  4. Nice book, I am interest about it. If It’s possible, please send me on my e-mail, thank you a lot .
    harel@harel.sk

    Peter W. Haas

    December 17, 2011 at 21:14

    • Hi Peter,

      Email sent via retransfer.com with the sheets attached. Hope you like it!

      Best,

      Indra

      December 20, 2011 at 22:10

  5. Thank you Indra,
    I will study :-)))

    Take care
    Peter

    December 21, 2011 at 15:15

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s