Kodak Technical Pan

This is film-stuff I was experimenting with some time before dedicating myself to my grad project and the Wet Plate Collodion issues. You might find the text somewhat dated simply because it is 😉 Below has been published before to Facebook about one and a half year ago.

Kodak Technical Pan is a film which is no longer in production. I was able to lay my hands on some stock with films almost as old as I am. The oldest one expired in 1985!
Regardless of that I decided to try them out and the results of the first 2 rolls were stunning! No fog or coloration visible. The film had hardly any mask at all.

So I experimented some more trying to fine-tune the development as I’m using HC110 which is not exactly the recommended developer for that type of film as it results in extremely contrasty negatives while still remaining amazingly detailed. One of the other features of this film is its red-sensitivity up to 700nm!

A thing worth mentioning as well is its grain. Hardly any. The sharpness is absolutely fabulous and comparable to mid-format. The examples you’re about to see have been taken on 35mm with a Nikon F100 & Sigma 24-70 f2.8.

I have ordered the RLC ( Rollei Low Contrast) developer which is said to be more suited for these type of films but I think it will kill what I love about it now. As I have not received it yet I’ll have to postpone my impressions of that developer and save it for later.

I’ll be experimenting some more in the future with the Rollei ATP-V1 and with the Gigabit TP film, said to be the successors of this Kodak film, the latter also available in sheet film.

Treated as a 100 ASA film. Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs too thin, very contrasty yet quite detailed.

Test 1: Kodak TP Treated as a 100 ASA film. Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs too thin, very contrasty yet quite detailed.

Kodak TP: Treated as a 100 ASA film. Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs too thin, very contrasty yet quite detailed.

Test 1: Kodak TP Treated as a 100 ASA film. Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs too thin, very contrasty yet quite detailed.

Kodak TP: Treated as a 100 ASA film. Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs too thin, very contrasty yet quite detailed.

Test 1: Kodak TP Treated as a 100 ASA film. Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs too thin, very contrasty yet quite detailed.

Test 2: Kodak TP Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs much much better, still incredibly contrasty while remaining extremely detailed. The are slightly over-developed so next time less development required.

Test 2: Kodak TP Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs much much better, still incredibly contrasty while remaining extremely detailed. The are slightly over-developed so next time less development required.

Test 2: Kodak TP Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs much much better, still incredibly contrasty while remaining extremely detailed. The are slightly over-developed so next time less development required.

Test 2: Kodak TP Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs much much better, still incredibly contrasty while remaining extremely detailed. The are slightly over-developed so next time less development required.

Test 2: Kodak TP Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs much much better, still incredibly contrasty while remaining extremely detailed. The are slightly over-developed so next time less development required.

Test 2: Kodak TP Developed in HC110, dillution B for 6 minutes. Negs much much better, still incredibly contrasty while remaining extremely detailed. The are slightly over-developed so next time less development required.

Test 3: Kodak TP Treated as a 25 ASA film. Shot in studio to see how it would react there. One light with softbox on one side, no reflection screen on the other side to see how much dynamic the film would contain. Developed in HC110, this time for 5 and half minutes. No longer overdeveloped but might try 5 minutes the next time to decrease contrast a little.

Test 3: Kodak TP Treated as a 25 ASA film. Shot in studio to see how it would react there. One light with softbox on one side, no reflection screen on the other side to see how much dynamic the film would contain. Developed in HC110, this time for 5 and half minutes. No longer overdeveloped but might try 5 minutes the next time to decrease contrast a little.

Test 3: Kodak TP Treated as a 25 ASA film. Shot in studio to see how it would react there. One light with softbox on one side, no reflection screen on the other side to see how much dynamic the film would contain. Developed in HC110, this time for 5 and half minutes. No longer overdeveloped but might try 5 minutes the next time to decrease contrast a little.

Test 3: Kodak TP Treated as a 25 ASA film. Shot in studio to see how it would react there. One light with softbox on one side, no reflection screen on the other side to see how much dynamic the film would contain. Developed in HC110, this time for 5 and half minutes. No longer overdeveloped but might try 5 minutes the next time to decrease contrast a little.

Test 3: Kodak TP Treated as a 25 ASA film. Shot in studio to see how it would react there. One light with softbox on one side, no reflection screen on the other side to see how much dynamic the film would contain. Developed in HC110, this time for 5 and half minutes. No longer overdeveloped but might try 5 minutes the next time to decrease contrast a little.

Test 3: Kodak TP Treated as a 25 ASA film. Shot in studio to see how it would react there. One light with softbox on one side, no reflection screen on the other side to see how much dynamic the film would contain. Developed in HC110, this time for 5 and half minutes. No longer overdeveloped but might try 5 minutes the next time to decrease contrast a little.

Test 4: Kodak TP Treated as a 25 ASA film. Shot in studio with a normal light, no flash. Reflection screen used to lit up the shades in my neck and on my shoulder. Developed in HC110, dillution B for 5 minutes. That's probably the lowest I'll go considering development time as the negatives are absolutely beautiful and contain incredible detail while remaining this contrasty.

Test 4: Kodak TP Treated as a 25 ASA film. Shot in studio with a normal light, no flash. Reflection screen used to lit up the shades in my neck and on my shoulder. Developed in HC110, dillution B for 5 minutes. That's probably the lowest I'll go considering development time as the negatives are absolutely beautiful and contain incredible detail while remaining this contrasty.

Test 5: Kodak TP in HC110: Developed for 5 minutes. Treated as a 25 asa film. Rich tonality, deep blacks and that works perfect for this subject. Gives it an industrial touch.

Test 5: Kodak TP in HC110: Developed for 5 minutes. Treated as a 25 asa film. Rich tonality, deep blacks and that works perfect for this subject. Gives it an industrial touch.

Test 5: Kodak TP in HC110: Developed for 5 minutes. Treated as a 25 asa film. Rich tonality, deep blacks and that works perfect for this subject. Gives it an industrial touch.

Test 5: Kodak TP in HC110: Developed for 5 minutes. Treated as a 25 asa film. Rich tonality, deep blacks and that works perfect for this subject. Gives it an industrial touch.

Conclusion: Again, I have been born too late!

Advertisements

2 responses

  1. I would recommend that you dilute the HC110 to at least 1:15. contrast can be added later much easier than trying to recreate lost detail in either the darkroom, or in the digital scan to print process.

    May 24, 2010 at 16:30

    • You are right about that. Lost detail = lost detail. I will dilute further the next time I have to deal with these films. For my own that’ll probably take some time though.. A bit too bad as I never finished my “research” to find the answers to all my questions I had when working with these films.

      May 25, 2010 at 11:52

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s