Kodak Technical Pan vs. Rollei ATP 1.1

Again, this text will come across as being dated simply because it is. This has been written about one and a half year ago. This experiment was meant to be taken to a further level but many things have gotten in between, so this outline is meant to show me where I left off exactly. I might be picking this up again in the future but I hardly ever work on 35mm anymore and on mid-format this Rollei ATP 1.1 is far more trickier than it already was on 35mm.

I have received the Rollei RLC developer and the ATP V1 films which gave me the opportunity to compare the 2 TP films.

Also this film is quite remarkable. Very little grain, nice contrasty, even with the RLC, and again no mask.
As you can see there’s something “wrong” with the images. They look solarized / posterized and it’s definitely a flaw in the negative itself and not caused by the scan. The Kodak as well as the Rollei suffer from this effect so it’s something that’s most likely caused by the developer or the way I treated it.

Been doing some research and it appeared to be a so called “Phenidone-effect” which might be a substance in the developer. When agitated too little it’s able to cause such flaws. But with the second batch I agitated more to eliminate this problem but it still was present, so that’s not what where the problem’s at.

Here’s a summary of what I did the first and the second time:

Batch 1:
Shot with the Nikon F100 with a Sigma 24-70 f2.8. Treated as a 40 ASA film.
Developed in RLC for 6 minutes, dillution 1+4. Developer mixed with normal water.
Agitated 5 every 30 seconds.
No stopbath used.
Normal fixing dillution, Amaloco X89.
Rinsed for more than half an hour.
Agepon normal dillution.
Temperature 20 degrees for all baths.

Batch 2 (of which I didn’t put any examples on here):
Shot with Nikon F100 with a Sigma 24-70 f2.8. Treated as 32 ASA film.
Treated in low-light conditions.
Developed in RLC for 6 minutes, dillution 1+4. Developer mixed with demi-water.
Agitated continuously the entire first minute, after that 5 every 30 seconds.
No stopbath used.
Fixer 2 times more dilluted as recommended on datasheet, Amaloco X89.
Rinsed for more than half an hour.
Agepon 3 times more dilluted as recommended on datasheet.
Temperature 20 degrees for all baths.

After doing some more research it was mentioned that the developer is very sensitive to silver residue which inevitably is left behind in the tank and on the reels when having developed plenty of films.
To eliminate this variable I will buy a new tank and use it with this developer only.

In the meanwhile I contacted Rollei to ask if they have ever encountered such a problem and they asked me to send them some sample negatives which I did.About a week later I got an envelop back home with my negatives, a testkit containing 4 Rollei ATP’s and the matching developer, the Rollei DC, which is a different one than I used. I also received an email explaining their findings.
They mentioned that the film was overexposed and that that causes the effect. The second film I developed was actually underexposed but since the contrast was too high when shot I had some real white parts in them and that’s where the effect occured, so in that case they could be right.

I’m gonna try another batch which I’ll develop with the Rollei DC developer and just go bracketing the exposure to see what happens next.
It’s being mentioned that the RLC is a real delicate developer so I would like to get it right. But the DC should provide me with more room to screw around. Have to see where that’ll get me.

Rollei ATP V1 in HC110; Developed for 5 minutes just like with the Kodak TP. Treated as a 40 asa film. A little overdeveloped as I lost some detail in the highlights.

Rollei ATP V1 in HC110; Developed for 5 minutes just like with the Kodak TP. Treated as a 40 asa film. A little overdeveloped as I lost some detail in the highlights.

Rollei ATP V1 in HC110; Developed for 5 minutes just like with the Kodak TP. Treated as a 40 asa film. A little overdeveloped as I lost some detail in the highlights.

Rollei ATP V1 in HC110; Developed for 5 minutes just like with the Kodak TP. Treated as a 40 asa film. A little overdeveloped as I lost some detail in the highlights.

Rollei ATP V1 in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes. Treated as a 40 asa film. Much more tonality than when developed in HC110. still suprisingly contrasty.  The weird part about this film developed in the RLC is that it looks solarized. Of course that's not possible as the films haven't come in contact with light before or while developing except for in the camera. Left me quite clueless as to what happened here. I have never seen anything like this on film.  After some research It appears to be from a specific chem in the developer, called Phenidone. When agitated too little while developing it's able to cause such "malfunction". Therefore it's advised to agitate continuously the first 30 seconds and then 5 every 30.

Rollei ATP V1 in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes. Treated as a 40 asa film. Much more tonality than when developed in HC110. still suprisingly contrasty. The weird part about this film developed in the RLC is that it looks solarized. Of course that's not possible as the films haven't come in contact with light before or while developing except for in the camera. Left me quite clueless as to what happened here. I have never seen anything like this on film. After some research It appears to be from a specific chem in the developer, called Phenidone. When agitated too little while developing it's able to cause such "malfunction". Therefore it's advised to agitate continuously the first 30 seconds and then 5 every 30.

Rollei ATP V1 in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes. Treated as a 40 asa film. Much more tonality than when developed in HC110. still suprisingly contrasty.

Rollei ATP V1 in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes. Treated as a 40 asa film. Much more tonality than when developed in HC110. still suprisingly contrasty.

Kodak TP in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes as advised with the ATP. Treated as a 25 asa film. Absolutely underdeveloped. Managable in the darkroom but far from perfect negatives.

Kodak TP in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes as advised with the ATP. Treated as a 25 asa film. Absolutely underdeveloped. Managable in the darkroom but far from perfect negatives.

Kodak TP in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes as advised with the ATP. Treated as a 25 asa film. Absolutely underdeveloped. Managable in the darkroom but far from perfect negatives.

Kodak TP in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes as advised with the ATP. Treated as a 25 asa film. Absolutely underdeveloped. Managable in the darkroom but far from perfect negatives.

Kodak TP in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes as advised with the ATP. Treated as a 25 asa film. Absolutely underdeveloped. Managable in the darkroom but far from perfect negatives.

Kodak TP in Rollei RLC: Developed for 6 minutes as advised with the ATP. Treated as a 25 asa film. Absolutely underdeveloped. Managable in the darkroom but far from perfect negatives.

The bracketing test will follow soon. These results have never been published before.

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2 responses

  1. Scott Marcellus

    You may want to try developing the ATP in Photographers Formulary TD-3. This is my developer of choice, and produces beautiful grain free negatives with none of the problems you’ve encountered. 120 Rollei ATP developed in TD-3 is my standard low speed film/dev combo. Great stuff.

    April 21, 2010 at 05:04

    • Hi Scott,

      Thank you for your comment. Never tried that developer. I’ve used Rollei DC developer which showed none of the above issues as well but it’s too grey for my taste. It took the “pop” out of the negatives. I’ve ended up preferring the Kodak HC110 although the negatives are extremely contrasty that way.

      I might take a look at that developer when I shoot film again some day. Thank you for the heads-up!

      -Indra

      April 21, 2010 at 09:12

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